EA Moondance

A Magical Evening to Benefit the Park | Sept 28, 2016

The Esplanade Association hosted our annual Moondance Gala fundraiser on Saturday, September 24. It was truly an amazing evening for the park, as well as a fantastic celebration for the Esplanade Association as we celebrated 15 years of making life better on the Esplanade.

The Moondance Gala is our organization’s largest fundraiser and is so vital to supporting the work that we do in the park.  This year, thanks to our supporters, we raised over $900,000 for the Esplanade!

We were so grateful to be surrounded by friends, long-time advocates and new supporters – all committed to caring for and improving the Charles River Esplanade.  We would like to extend a special thanks to this year’s Moondance Co-Chairs, Lori and Matthew Sidman as well as all who served on the Moondance Gala committee.

The theme of this year’s Moondance Gala was Back to Our Roots.  To carry this theme into the park, the plants and trees used to decorate the tents this year will be planted in the Esplanade following the event. With the tents looking out onto the park, the amazing decor, and the fantastic group of supporters, it was truly an unforgettable night.

While paying tribute to the Esplanade Association’s founding friends, Executive Director, Tani Marinovich quoted President Teddy Roosevelt:

“We are not building this country of ours for a day. It is to last through the ages.  Any generation fit to do its work must work for the future, for the people of the future, as well as for itself.”

This year proceeds from the evening will help to fund new initiatives including the restoration of the historic Lotta Fountain, the introduction of a Wayfinding Signage System, the development of a long term maintenance and succession plan for the park’s over 1,700 trees, and the beginning of the process to restore the Lee Pool area.

The support of our sponsors, in-kind donors, members of the Event Committee, Board of Directors, and guests – will ensure that the Esplanade continues to enrich the community and all of our lives for generations to come.  We thank all of our supporters for joining us in making life better on the Esplanade.

Esplanade Eats | Sept 14, 2016

One of the best things about the Esplanade is that while the park feels secluded and peaceful, it is only a short stroll from Boston’s bustling neighborhoods. This makes it easy to pick up lunch at a nearby restaurant and enjoy it in the park!

One of my favorite local places is Pressed, a quick-serve health food spot in Beacon Hill. Its location on Charles Street makes stopping in on your way to the Esplanade a breeze. Pressed serves cold-pressed juices, superfood shakes, homemade paletas (popsicles), and healthy lunch items.

On a hot day, there is no better way to cool off than with a superfood shake – my favorite one, simply called “Calm”, is a perfect blend of house-made chai, banana, coconut, almond milk, almond butter, dates, and hemp protein.

Another popular menu item at Pressed is the superfood sushi, a delicious combination of sweet potato, avocado, cucumber, burdock and yacon roots, seasonal pickled vegetables, black rice, and a miso-ginger dipping sauce.

Pressed is designed with the on-the-go health foodie in mind. The space is small, but inviting. Limited seating encourages patrons to grab their food and drinks and explore the neighborhood. This design, coupled with its accessible location, makes Pressed the perfect place to stock up for a healthy picnic on the Esplanade!

Next time you’re in the neighborhood, or on the Esplanade, give Pressed a try. It is located at 120 Charles Street.

esplanade association annual report

Participate in August Tree Check Month | Aug 6, 2016

By Esplanade Association

Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, ALB adults continue to be active in Massachusetts in August. In fact, the US Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has called August Tree Check Month, as it is a prime time to find ALB adult beetles and report any insects or signs of infestation.

Importance of Pruning | July 20, 2016

If you don’t have your own trees to care for you may not realize how important, and sometimes daunting, the task of pruning can be. Pruning not only improves the health of the park trees but also ensures the safety of park visitors.

Pruning a tree can have many benefits. The first and most important is keeping the people around it safe. A dead branch can fall from a tree at any time, endangering nearby people, buildings, and power lines. Removing dangerous limbs and maintaining a safe tree is always the best course of action. However, depending on the size of the tree and the location of the branches to be pruned, pruning itself can also be very dangerous. To ensure your own personal safety, we recommend you let an expert do any pruning you’re not absolutely comfortable and confident in doing.

Tree growth and structure

There are many reasons why pruning a tree is important. Pruning a tree can influence in what way the tree grows. With proper pruning, a tree can be made to grow into a certain configuration of limbs and branches that is more ideal for the structural integrity of the tree. Maintaining the tree’s structure helps to mitigate the risk of broken limbs and falling branches. A properly pruned tree will not have compromising branch structures and improper weight distribution that could lead to disaster later on in the tree’s life. Structural pruning can also greatly improve the general look of the tree. If aesthetics are important to you, proper pruning can make a tree grow in the desired fashion.

When to prune

Remember, it’s important that any pruning (other than emergency branch removal) be done in late fall or winter, during the dormant season. It’s during this time that the tree is least susceptible to harm that may result from pruning. Trees are susceptible to stress just like any other creature, and removing their branches does cause damage to the tree. When the tree is dormant, however, less sap is lost and, since they are dormant as well, insects and fungus are less likely to further damage the tree. Certain species of trees require more precise timing and different approaches for proper pruning. If you’re ever in doubt, contact a certified arborist instead of risking both the tree’s safety and your own.

Less is more

It’s also important to remember not to prune too much off of a tree. Generally, you want to prune the smallest amount you possibly can that achieves the desired effect. Never prune more than ¼ of the crown of a tree, as this is where most of its leaves are located and consequently where it gets most of its energy. You run the risk of fatally damaging the tree if too much is pruned too quickly. Again, a certified arborist is your best bet if you want the job done properly and safely the first time.

Information by vintagetreecare on Jan 14 in Tree Care

Learn more about tree care by visiting their site athttp://www.vintagetreecare.com